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History

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PIRATES TIMELINE
1887-1900 | 1901-1925 | 1926-1950 | 1951-1975 | 1976-2000 | 2001-Present
Timeline
1951  - May 6 -- Cliff Chambers pitches the second no-hitter in Pirates' history, a 3-0 victory in the second game of a doubleheader at Boston.
1952  - September 27 -- Ralph Kiner finishes the season with a league-leading 37 homers to clinch his seventh consecutive N.L. home run crown.
1953  - June 4 -- General manager Branch Rickey traded future Hall of Famer Ralph Kiner, the only man to lead his league in home runs for seven consecutive seasons.
1954  - April 13 -- Seven years after Jackie Robinson broke baseball's color barrier, Pittsburgh rookie second baseman Curt Roberts makes his major league debut during the season opener at Forbes Field to become the first African American to play for the Pirates.
1955  - April 17 -- Roberto Clemente, a 20-year-old rookie from Carolina, Puerto Rico, makes his Major League debut in right field at Forbes Field.
1956  - May 28 -- First baseman Dale Long sets a major league record by hitting a home run in his eighth consecutive game, a 3-2 win over the Brooklyn Dodgers at Forbes Field.
1957  - August 4 -- Former Pirates' second baseman Danny Murtaugh makes his managerial debut after being hired by General Manager Joe L. Brown to replace Bobby Bragan at the helm.
1959  - May 26 -- In baseball's most remarkable pitching performance, Harvey Haddix throws 12 perfect innings against the Braves in Milwaukee, only to lose the game, 1-0, in the 13th on an error, sacrifice bunt, intentional walk and double.
1960  - October 13 -- In Game Seven of the World Series at Forbes Field, Bill Mazeroski leads off the bottom of the ninth with the most dramatic home run in Series history, a blast over the left field wall, breaking a 9-9 tie with the Yankees and bringing Pittsburgh its third World Championship.
1968  - April 25 -- Groundbreaking ceremonies are held for Three Rivers Stadium, the new home of the Pirates (and Steelers) to be constructed on Pittsburgh's North Side. Among the featured speakers is former track star and Olympic Champion Jesse Owens.
1969  - September 20 -- At New York's Shea Stadium, Bob Moose stops the pennant-bound Mets, 4-0, with a no-hitter, just the third in franchise history.
1970  - June 12 -- At Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego, Dock Ellis no-hits the Padres, 2-0, to become the fourth Pirates pitcher to accomplish the feat.

June 28 -- The Pirates sweep a doubleheader from the Chicago Cubs, 3-2 and 4-1, in the final games at 61-year-old Forbes Field.

July 16 -- In the first game at Three Rivers Stadium, the Pirates take the field in revolutionary double knit uniforms, and leave the field 3-2 losers to the Cincinnati Reds.

1971  - September 1 -- The Pirates field what is believed to be baseball's first all-minority lineup in a 10-7 win over the Phillies at Three Rivers.

October 13 -- At Three Rivers Stadium, Milt May drives in the winning run with a pinch-hit single in the eighth as the Pirates defeat the Baltimore Orioles in Game Four of the Fall Classic, the first night World Series game in baseball history.

October 17 -- Steve Blass hurls a four-hitter and Roberto Clemente homers as the Pirates win Game Seven of the World Series, 2-1, at Baltimore, earning Pittsburgh its fourth World Championship.

1972  - September 30 -- At Three Rivers Stadium, Roberto Clemente hits a fourth-inning double off Jon Matlack and becomes only the 11th player in major league history to reach the 3,000 hit plateau.
1975  - September 16 -- Rennie Stennett sets a modern major league record by going 7-for-7 in a nine-inning game at Chicago's Wrigley Field.
1887-1900 | 1901-1925 | 1926-1950 | 1951-1975 | 1976-2000 | 2001-Present